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What to See and Do

Prague is seen as the cultural capital of Czech Republic. This is a city that host different musical festivals like Prague Spring International Music Festival, the Prague Autumn International Music Festival, the Prague International Jazz Festival and so on.

Charles Bridge
Commissioned by King Charles IV in 1357, Prague’s most stunning bridge spans 16 arches and is lined with 30 Baroque statues of religious figures. The bridge’s 1,700 ft. (520 m) of cobblestone are used for wholly temporal purposes. Each afternoon, painters and hot-dog vendors fight for space with — and custom from — the hordes of tourists who are themselves elbowing one another for the best views of the Vltava River. If you arrive at dawn, you’ll beat the crowds and enjoy a glorious scenery.

Prague Castle
Roughly the size of seven football fields, Prague Castle is the largest ancient castle in the world. Built and renovated during 13 centuries, the complex includes churches, gardens, alleyways and royal residences that would take days to appreciate. Don’t miss the St. Vitus Cathedral. In addition to Art Nouveau stained-glass windows and a wooden depiction of the crucifixion, it houses treasures like the tomb of St. John of Nepomuk — a blinding two-metric-ton vault that is held up by an army of silver angels.


See the Treasures of St. Vitus Cathedral
St. Vitus cathedral is one of the attractions located in the castle grounds. It is visible from all around the city of Prague. Although the cathedral looks many hundreds of years old, it was in fact completed in 1929. Many treasures await visitors including the tomb of St John of Nepomunk, the splendid Chapel of St. Wenceslas and the magnificent art nouveau stained glass.


Museum of Communism
Under communist rule, authorities arrested more than 200,000 Czechs and shot 327 others dead as they tried to flee across the border. The simple but stirring Memorial to the Victims of Communism captures that agony with six sculptures of a man in progressive decay. Just as moving are the literal depictions of state-sponsored terrorism, told through photos, propaganda and videos at the Museum of Communism — although here the story ends on a high note, with galleries on the peaceful “velvet revolution” that ended the nightmare.



Infant Jesus of Prague
Located in the Mala Strana in the heart of the city, the Infant Jesus of Prague (also known as the Child of Prague) is a Roman Catholic statue of Jesus Christ as an infant. Everyday hundreds of believers pay a visit to this shrine to pray, bow and make wishes hoping that they will come true. The statue itself is encased in an ornate gilded shrine and while the origin of the figure is unknown, it has been dated back to the 16th Century.



Explore the Old Town Square
Despite Prague’s lively history of invasions, the Old Town Square has remained relatively untouched since the 10th Century. Swarms of tourists crowd the historical streets, packing out the alfresco restaurants every day. The square itself is the perfect place to admire the wonderful architecture Prague has to offer and if that isn’t your thing then the various street performers, musicians and merchants that line the streets here will certainly keep you entertained.



Drink a world-famous beer (or two) and visit the Czech Beer Museum
The Czechs claim to have the best beer (pivo) in the world and Prague is a great place to test their claim. The huge choice of bars in the city offer famous Czech lagers such as Budvar and Staropramen alongside craft beers from the top microbreweries in the country. Most Czech beers are light beers, brewed naturally from hand-picked hops. Increasingly, breweries are producing a dark ale too as an alternative, but most Czechs like their beer light, nicely chilled and with a tall head. Beer aficionados should also ensure a visit to the Prague Beer Museum which offers more than 31 quality beers on tap.


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